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Bardo, home of fine dining and hot dogs, has closed

Bardo in pre-bardo

Bardo in pre-bardo Alma Guzman

"I am very sad to announce that tonight will be the last night for Bardo, after which we will be closed for good," wrote the restaurant's chef-owner Remy Pettus, addressing the city’s dining community. 

The missive was posted to Pettus’s personal social media accounts on Sunday evening just before dinner service would take place, inviting guests to sneak in one last visit to "say goodbye to what has been a truly magical place.”

The chef opened Bardo in the former Rachel’s space after departing Eastside. When the spot debuted in August of 2017, its earliest incarnation included knee-bucklingly good lamb burger, as well as a standard 18 percent service charge in place of tipping – both of which ended up getting the chop.

When the recipient of this year’s Best Fine Dining award hit its stride, it was in that feeling of revolution, with its sides often overshadowing the menu's mains; its ever-changing offerings relied heavily on locally sourced ingredients, combined and layered to symphonic effect.

But COVID-19 altered Bardo's course, too. The pandemic saw the restaurant pivot to slinging carryout for the first time, then again to a new menu concept intended as a stopgap until the pandemic let up: hot dogs. The establishment also got a new, cheeky name to match: "BardoG."

Though the wieners were predicted to be temporary, Pettus explained, “the old Bardo as it was is not coming back.” 

Indeed, as of this morning, the incarnations of 222 E. Hennepin have passed on entirely, resembling the state of post-life limbo for which it was named.

Find Pettus’s full parting message below:

I am very sad to announce that tonight will be the last night for Bardo, after which we will be closed for good. Thank...

Posted by Remy Pettus on Sunday, September 20, 2020