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Would you work for Amy Klobuchar? [POLL]

Amy Klobuchar says her management style gets results. She's right about that... though sometimes the results it gets are staffers deciding not to work for her anymore.

Amy Klobuchar says her management style gets results. She's right about that... though sometimes the results it gets are staffers deciding not to work for her anymore. CNN

Because: obviously some people won't.

Aside from reports of a very high (highest in the U.S. Senate) turnover rate, and stories of strongly worded emails sent to multiple staffers at odd hours of the night, there are also numerous people who declined to join DFL U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar's campaign. According to BuzzFeed, some insiders knew Klobuchar -- or the rumors about her, which have been around for years in D.C. -- and decided they didn't want to work for someone like that.

Klobuchar's presidential campaign launch continued with a CNN town hall-style question and answer session last night, some pretty good exposure for a newly minted candidate from a flyover state. By all accounts, including this one from the Star Tribune, she handled herself pretty well. 

She's good at this part, the public-facing accountability and campaigning part. Ask the multiple Republicans she's beaten to win or hold her office. (Or the ones who clearly didn't want to be recruited to run against her.)

But.

At one point in the CNN session, Klobuchar faced a question about her management style, and the stories of how demanding and unforgiving she can be to people she relies on to get things done. And she does, indeed, get things done: As of 2016, she'd seen more of her bills signed into law than any other member of Congress.

"Is there an aspect of your leadership or communications style that you would like to improve upon moving forward?" asked Bob Gigliotti, a professor in the Business department at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, New Hampshire.

St. Anselm, for what it's worth, was known as an expert on the concept of atoning for one's sins and confessing wrong-doing, so this question was pretty well loaded with symbolic meaning.

Klobuchar offered a tight grin while Gigliotti asked his question, then thanked him for asking it and stood up to answer. 

"First of all, you have to know I love my staff," Klobuchar began, before pointing out that some staffers were in attendance Monday night, and that her chief of staff has been with her "for six years." 

It may be true that Amy loves her staff. But do they love working for her? Accounts vary, and many have felt it necessary to leave her office, sometimes after only a brief period working for her. 

Klobuchar confessed to the St. Anselm professor that she's not easy to work for, and said she's taken on challenging roles in both the public and private sector. Essentially her answer boiled down to: she's a tough boss, but gets results and drives her employees to be their very best. As usual, she handled the tough question well. 

Here's another tough question: Would you work for someone with Klobuchar's reputation?

Would you work for Amy Klobuchar?
Yes
No
Only if she was running for president
Only if she promised not to email me in the middle of the night
Only if she promises she can beat Donald Trump